ZDSP 2A 12-24v Stepper Motor Controller with 24 bit speed resolution

£32.00

The Zikodrive ZDSP is a 2A 12-24v stepper motor controller featuring 24 bit speed resolution, full programmability and a range of optional inputs and plugin hardware.ZDSP 2A 12-24v stepper motor controller datasheet Designed to work well with all NEMA 17 and small NEMA 23 motors.

RangeDiscount
10 - 255 %
26 - 5010 %
51 - 10015 %
101 - 25018 %
251 - 50020 %
501 - 100030 %

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Description

A simple 2A 12-24v stepper motor controller with a lot to offer

The Zikodrive ZDSP is a 2A 12-24v stepper motor controller designed for NEMA 17 and smaller NEMA 23 stepper motors. The ZDSP features a range of advanced features including full programmability and 24 bit speed resolution making it perfect for applications where high levels of speed control are important. This version of the ZDSP is designed to be controlled using analogue inputs (either 0-5v signal or external hardware such as a potentiometer or Zikodrive plugin board. However, if you require more in depth control over the ZDSP please consider the ZDSPUART version of the controller which will allow you to gain deep level control over the settings within the ZDSP.

Mounted easily onto a NEMA 17 or NEMA 23 with bracket

The ZDSP 2A 12-24v stepper motor controller is specifically designed to be able to be mounted onto the rear of a NEMA 17. We sell standardised packages such as the ZDSPN1718 package which offers up to 0.65Nm but you can also choose to mix and match the controller with any motor of your choice.

24 bit speed resolution for incredible speed accuracy

The ZDSP boasts 24 bit speed resolution allowing for over 7m possible speeds. In applications such as dosing or pump applications where exact speed is critical to getting the right performance this level of control goes well beyond what you could ever need.

Ahead of the competition

The ZDSP outperforms all other stepper motor controllers in its price bracket. It is a stepper motor controller built for performance first.

Specification / Data

Voltage Range 11-30Vdc
Current 0-2A adjustable
Microstep Resolution Full step, Half Step, Quarter Step or 1/16 step
Pulse Input Optional 0-5Vdc input 10bit Available
Onboard speed control Potentiometer with 23 Turn (10 bit)
Over current protection Enabled
Over heat protection Enabled
Reverse Polarity Protection Fitted
Control Logic Inputs -0.3 to 6Vdc
Max RPM Typically 1000rpm depending on motor and operating voltage (Contact us for more details)
Operating ambient temperature 0~+50˚C
Conservation temperature – 20~+70˚C
Operating ambient humidity 35~85% RH (no condensation)
Conservation humidity 10~90% RH (no condensation)
Speed Resolution 24 bit speed resolution enables exceptionally fine speed accuracy (16777215 total speeds available).
Encoder Feedback Yes
Closed loop feedback Yes
Intelligence ZDSP is fully programmable, enabling it to store key parameters or run specific programmes on signal input (contact us for more details)

Additional information

Weight 0.1 kg
Dimensions 7 x 7 x 4 cm

FAQs

What are the main advantages of using stepper motors?

POSITIONAL ACCURACY WITH STEPPER MOTORS

In general the main use of stepper motors is in motor control applications where positional accuracy is hugely important. Whereas a ‘traditional’ brushed DC motor turns constantly as soon as enough power is applied, a stepper motor can be turned an exact number of steps (up to 25600 steps in one complete revolution with a stepper motor drivers such as the ZD2). Depending on the number of degrees per step in the motor (this varies from motor to motor but in a standard 200 step motor this equates to 1.8 degrees per step) this can then enable the motor to move from one fixed position to another fixed position at any point of the circle. By using intelligent controllers such as the ZD series of stepper motor drivers, this movement can then be controlled very accurately with programmable acceleration and deceleration curves being applied. This is especially useful in dosing or process control applications where exceptional accuracy is crucial.

STEPPER MOTOR PERFORMANCE IS 90% DOWN TO THE STEPPER MOTOR CONTROLLER

The way in which a stepper motor performs and is able to operate is clearly heavily influenced by the build quality of that particularly motor. Conventional factors such as the quality of the bearings and magnets used are still of great importance. However, in terms of delivering the true potential of the stepper, it is the controller that can really make a difference.

As an example a simple stepper motor driver will simple convert an input current and voltage into motor torque and speed. Compare this to a comprehensive ‘all in one’ stepper motor driver and controller such as the Zikodrive ZD4 Stepper Motor Controller which has onboard memory, 128 microstepping and full programmability. With the ZD4 Stepper Motor Controller being used it becomes possible to directly control the stepper motor position, its acceleration and deceleration curves, custom startup sequences, the exact speed and torque and to store these settings within the controller. This enables the stepper motor to be completely optimised and opens up a whole new world of potential mechanical performance and applications.

ALTERNATIVE APPLICATIONS FOR STEPPER MOTORS

The simplest case study which highlights some of the advantages of stepper motors of this type of application is the rotary prism system built by Zikodrive Motor Controllers and S3 Design. Whereas a brushless DC motor and controller would require careful calibration, timing and the use of encoders and limit switches to rotate a prism 120 degrees, wait a set time and rotate another 120 degrees, with a stepper motor this can be achieved relatively simply because it is possible to measure the exact number of steps required to make this movement and use an intelligent controller to make this movement.

If one considers more complex applications such as robotics or highly accurate dosing equipment then one can appreciate how useful having this level of control would be. By adding a controller capable of microstepping such as the ZD4 Stepper Motor Driver (this offers up to 128 microsteps) it is possible to gain exceptional positional accuracy. Based on a standard 1.8 degree 200 step stepper motor, the ZD4 Stepper Motor Driver can move accurately between any of 25600 points of a circle.

CONCLUSION – COMPLETE MOTOR CONTROL

Fundamentally, it can therefore be the key advantages of stepper motors is that they enable the motor to stop and start at any point required with exceptional accuracy. In combination with an intelligent stepper motor controller it is possible to achieve exceptional positional accuracy and performance from a stepper motor that is quite simply unachievable with any other type of motor.

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Replacing a brushed DC motor with a stepper motor and controller?

REPLACING BRUSHED DC MOTORS WITH STEPPER MOTORS – THE QUICK ANSWER

Yes but you must be careful to make sure that the specifications of the original motor you have and the new motor and controller you install match. If in doubt at all you can CONTACT US to discuss your application.

AN EMERGING TREND IN THE MOTION CONTROL INDUSTRY

Many companies are increasingly replacing DC motors with brushless DC motors and brushless motor controllers in a wide range of systems.

You can find out more about this by reading our article on replacing brushed DC motors with brushless motors.

However, swapping DC motors to stepper motors and controllers is less common. That said, as with lots of things in life and in engineering, just because something is not common, does not necessarily make it a bad idea. There are a number of specific applications in which replacing a brushed DC system, (particularly a geared DC system) with a stepper motor and controller can be a very sensible choice.

WHY SHOULD I REPLACE A BRUSHED DC MOTOR WITH A STEPPER MOTOR?

The simple benefits of doing so are that you will improve the lifespan of the system you have (stepper motors only have bearings as parts that can wear out as opposed to brushes).

Stepper motors also improve the range of performance options available (they can turn a fixed number of degrees easily).

Stepper motors can also be used to increase the

REPLACING GEARED DC MOTORS WITH STEPPER MOTORS AND CONTROLLERS IN DOSING APPLICATIONS

What is more common is to replace geared brushed DC motors with a stepper motor in applications such as pumps, lab equipment and similar applications where positional accuracy can be improved vastly by using a stepper motor and stepper motor controller.

Many applications were addressed in years gone by by using a geared DC motor and timing as a means of dosing and measuring – however developments in stepper motor controller technology such as on the ZD4 Stepper Motor Controller means that huge advances have been made in the accuracy, flexibility and performance of suhc systems.

Of equal importance, the cost of such technology has dropped considerably in recent years, making advanced performance options affordable to a broad range of applications.

Whereas 10 or 20 years ago a programmable stepper motor controller would have cost a fortune, these days it is much less.

The result of this trend is that many people and companies have started to look at replacing geared brushed DC motors with stepper motor controllers as a means of improving the performance of the system and also as a way of adding more features.

DON’T FORGET TO DO YOUR HOMEWORK

The key to making the transition between the two units successful is making sure you know the performance characteristics and key specifications of the motor that you are wanting to replace and then being able to make an appropriate match with a stepper motor and controller. If you are not sure how to find out the performance characteristics of the motor (and gearbox) that you have you can start with the part number of the motor and research that. Key characteristics to look for are max and nominal RPM and torque.

Once you have these details you then need to source an appropriate stepper motor with the right performance characteristics. Don’t forget to check the torque speed curve of the motor to make sure it will deliver the torque you need at the speed you want (if you are not sure about this you can find out more about this by reading our guide to understanding torque speed curves). If you have any questions at all about implementing this system then you can always CONTACT US and talk to one of our engineers about your specific project or application.

WHAT NEXT?

If you have an existing project where you are looking to replace a DC motor with a stepper motor and controller you could start by having a look at our main STEPPER MOTOR page. This page has links to case studies, applications, stepper motors with controllers and much more…

If you have any questions about anything that you have read above please feel free to CONTACT US to discuss.

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How much speed can I get with a stepper motor?

THE AVERAGE MAXIMUM SPEED OF A STEPPER MOTOR

Generally speaking the top speed of a stepper motor is approximately 1000rpm. The exact speeds that are possible depend on the specific motor being used and the controller being used with it. For example it is possible to overdrive a smaller stepper motor with a higher powered controller but this will result in reduced life span and any of the benefits of doing so will largely be minimal in comparison to using a brushless DC motor at the rated speed. It is important to remember that the torque generated by a stepper motor is significantly reduced as the speed increases.

If you would like more information on torque speed curves and how they can help you choose the best motor for your project then please see What is a torque/speed curve and how does it affect what I need?

If you need to go above this speed but still require intelligent control of the motor you should consider a brushless DC motor and controller (brushless ESC).

STEPPER MOTORS HAVE DECREASING TORQUE AS THE SPEED INCREASES

A point which is often overlooked is the fact that the available torque from a stepper motor decreases significantly as the speed increases. This often means that in applications where the motor is under a certain load (which it obviously has to be as it is driving something) the max speed will be inherently reduced by the amount of load on the motor. This is why it is so important to understand the load that you need to place on the motor when choosing a motor.

I NEED A LOWER SPEED AND A HIGHER TORQUE FROM A STEPPER MOTOR

If you need a lower speed and higher torque to make your motor control project work do not forget that you can always use geared stepper motors. Gearbox ratios typically range from 2:1 up to about 50:1 and this can dramatically increase the torque available from the stepper motor (albeit at the cost of significantly reducing the maximum speed available from the stepper motor). For example, a typical NEMA 17 stepper motor with a ZDSP Stepper motor driver will be able to achieve 0.65Nm of torque. However, by adding a gearbox to this motor – such as in the case of the ZDSPN1727GB geared stepper motor and driver package this can be increased up to 3Nm.

CONCLUSION – THINK ABOUT THE KEY SPECIFICATIONS THAT YOU NEED AND THEN DECIDE WHICH MOTOR AND CONTROLLER IS BEST FOR YOUR APPLICATION

The maximum speed of a stepper motor is dictated by a combination of stepper motor size, the type of stepper motor controller that it is being used with and also the specific application that it is going into. All of these factors need to be considered when assessing how much speed you can realistically achieve for a set application or package.

If you have any questions at all about this please feel free to get in touch with us to discuss your requirements with one of our engineers.

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NEMA Motor Frame Size Guide for Stepper Motors

FIRST THINGS FIRST

The frame size of motors is used for both stepper motors and brushless DC motors but it is used most commonly with stepper motors as a useful shorthand for power and torque.

Always remember that (within the NEMA sizing system) the length of the motor will vary but the NEMA frame size simply refers to the diameter of the motor face.

Most commonly these faces are square (for example the ZD4N2318 which is a square faced NEMA 23 stepper motor) but in some cases they may be circular.

Frame sizes are split up into NEMA (National Electronic Manufacturers Association) ratings which are a useful shorthand for motor sizes.

DIAMETER ISN’T EVERYTHING WHEN IT COMES TO STEPPER MOTOR POWER

Changing the stack length will generally not impact on the speeds that you can get but it will have a major impact on the torque (turning force) that you are able to achieve.

For example the ZD2N2318 and ZD10N2318 stepper motors are both NEMA 23 motors (therefore 57mm diameter) but the ZD2N2318 is 42mm long whereas the ZD10N2318 is 104 mm long.

The difference in torque between the 2 motors is 0.6Nm for the ZD2N2318 and 2.4Nm for the ZD10N2318. The difference in stack length of a motor with the same NEMA rating has therefore quadrupled the possible torque.

THE STEPPER MOTOR CONTROLLER YOU CHOOSE MATTERS!

Equally the stepper motor controller that you use will have a major impact on the mechanical performance you are able to achieve using the motor. If the controller is not able to deliver more poewr than the motor can handle then it is unlikely that you will be able to achieve the maximum possible mechanical performance from the motor.

As an example of this, our stepper motors with integrated controllers have higher powered controllers the bigger the motors get.

See the table below for an overview of frame sizes.

MOTOR FRAMES AND TYPICAL SPECIFICATIONS FOR STEPPER MOTORS

WHAT NEXT?

If your interest in motor sizes was purely academic then we hope we have helped. If you have any questions about this please do not hesitate to get in touch and we will do our best to help.

Alternatively if you are looking for a motor and aren’t sure which is best for your application then you could start by having a quick look at our standard range.

We offer a range of stepper motors of different sizes which are available in geared or standard format.

As always, if you have any questions about choosing the right motor or the pros and cons of a long stack NEMA 17 versus a short stack NEMA 23 (for example) then you can get in touch with us via online chat, phone or email.

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